Detailing the Problems with a New Car

If you start having problems with a new car as soon as it rolls off of the lot, you might have a lemon. The automobile Lemon Law in California is designed to protect consumers who buy defective cars. According to the Department of Consumer Affairs, new car buyers can also help themselves by taking a few simple steps when bringing their vehicle in for repairs. It’s important for consumers to keep records of every service call on their car. This includes making sure that the service notes provided by the mechanic are as detailed as possible about the problem and the work performed. It’s also vital to take the car into an authorized dealer for all warranty repairs. Not doing this will give the dealer’s Lemon Law lawyers in Los Angeles the opportunity to say that the Lemon Law doesn’t apply since you didn’t take it to the proper...

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GPS Tracking Systems

As you already probably know that the GPS tracking system has been in use by the United States military since 1973, and has been recently opened up to the public for commercial and personal use. With a total of 27 satellites that have been set up by the Department of Defense over a period of time, all one has to do is remain in the direct line of sight of four or more of these satellites at any given point of time. And the orbits are arranged that way at any given point of time, so almost anyone with a GPS tracking device anywhere can instantly find his or her location. Unlike the lojack which uses radio signals, GPS uses microwave signal specifically known as L1 and L2 to transmit these signals to a GPS receiver in real time, and which has the capability to travel through glass, plastic and clouds but not solid objects such as buildings. One big advantage of using these signals is the effect of weather on the transmission of these signals, which of course, is none. In this day and age of satellite tracking, there are a number of uses for GPS and while the L1 signal is used purely for civilian purposes, the L2 signal is used for military purposes and which is obviously stronger than its civilian...

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New Lithium Technology Could Increase Battery Life Tenfold

The current breed of lithium ion batteries is providing an unprecedented amount of power for commercial and personal applications while being smaller and more portable than ever before. For example, a lithium ground power unit can be much more easily transported and handled by an airport ground crew because it is more than 40 percent lighter and 30 percent more compact than similar lead-acid batteries. While the current technology in lithium batteries is already quite advanced from previous models, Discovery News reports that new breakthroughs on the horizon might make the current level of lithium power seem like the Dark Ages. According to the report, researchers at MIT have discovered that using carbon nanotubes for one of the battery’s electrodes allowed a lithium ion cell phone battery to significantly increase its longevity and amount of energy that can be stored. Carbon nanotubes could mean that batteries will last up to 10 times longer than current lithium ion batteries do. This would have major ramifications for everything from cell phone batteries to the lithium twin pack starters used in transportation to start airplanes, boats and trains with turbine...

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New Lettuce Harvester to Use Water Jet Technology

According to notes from the United Fresh 2009 expo by The Packer, specialized harvesting manufacturer Ramsay Highlander, Inc. plans to release in June a patented commercial lettuce harvester that uses water jets. Advantages of using water cutting for lettuce harvesting, says Ramsay Highlander CEO Frank Maconachy, include food safety. Water jets’ precision cutting will not cause bleeding or browning as conventional harvesters sometimes do. Although it is best known for things like glass cutting, water jet technology’s efficacy in food cutting has long been established. Food Production Daily magazine wrote in 2005 that “water jet technology is one of the fastest growing major machine tool processes in the world due to its versatility and ease of operation…The technology offers processors sanitary advantages over other mechanical cutting methods, since there is no bacterial transfer from food to food or from tool to food. There is also no downtime for sharpening as there is with knives. Operator safety is improved because water jets can be remotely controlled by robotics.” Using water jets for food cutting has also gained popularity due to its preservation of the material being cut and the very small kerf width—this means that very little food is wasted in the process. Additionally, water jet cutting does not produce harmful vapors or hazardous...

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How Paintball Gun Technology Has Changed

Article written by Nate’s Ebook News Since the first game of paintball was played in 1981, the sport has evolved from something more like Capture the Flag to today’s sophisticated activity with several incarnations such as Woodsball, X-Ball, Speedball, etc. But if you haven’t been playing for many years, you might not know about all of the changes in paintball guns and paintball gun accessories that have been made over the years. 68Caliber runs a series of articles called “Then and Now” that looks at the evolution of the sport, including changes in gun technology, the latest feature. Author Steve Davidson talks about how the limited options when he started playing in 1983 (the Sheridan PGP, the Nelspot 007, and the NSG Splatmaster) have widened to include hundreds of branded options, with upgrades being offered often. The heavy, clunky, fixed-barrel, single-shot “old skool” guns have been replaced with sleeker, lighter, guns with semi-auto/electronically assisted firing modes. It’s a read that’s definitely worth checking...

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New Technology Captures, Reuses Waste Heat

Greater efficiency can pay big dividends, whether it’s a more efficient 40 kw generator or a more efficient 400 kw generator. Jonathan Fahey of Forbes reports that researchers at Oregon State University (OSU), through a partnership with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, are developing a device that will improve efficiency by capturing waste heat and using it to power other applications. The device will be first used by the U.S. Army, which will attach the device to the exhaust systems of its diesel generators. The captured heat will then power air conditioners that keep the electronics at the army’s mobile command centers cool during battle. An estimated 75% of the energy used to power the army’s generators becomes waste heat, according to the Forbes article. And because the air conditioners require about half of the electricity produced by the generators, funneling the waste heat into other uses could result in much greater efficiency and more available electricity for communications equipment while also reducing fuel consumption by as much as 30% and offsetting some of the hundreds of dollars in costs of running the generators. Moreover, the technology could also reduce the number of generators needed in the field. If successful, the technology could also be applied to other kinds of motors in the future, although it is still too expensive to commercialize in the short term. Keep up with the latest developments and technology through General Power Limited. Whether your application calls for a 10 kw diesel generator or a 1000 kw diesel generator, the experts at General Power Limited can advise on sizing and installation and create a customized power package. Find everything from John Deere to Kohler diesel generator models, parts, accessories, and more at competitive prices at General Power...

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